Video Stream Out TOP

From TouchDesigner 088 Wiki


PythonIcon.png videostreamoutTOP_Class

Summary

The Video Stream Out TOP creates an RTSP server to send H.264 video and MP3 audio across the network. It uses Nvidia's hardware H264 encoder to achieve low-latency encoding. It can handle multiple clients connecting to it at the same time. Multiple Video Stream Out TOPs using the same port will be handled using the same underlying RTSP server.

Note: It does not support other protocols such as RTMP, or sending directly to another RTSP server via RTP.

Obtain the URL to connect to the RTSP server by using an Info DAT or by middle clicking on the node. It will be in the form:

rtsp://<ipaddress>:<port>/<streamName>

e.g.

rtsp://192.168.0.1:554/tdvidstream

The Video Stream Out TOP is only available in Commercial and Pro.

Note: The maximum stream outs on a NVIDIA Geforce card is 2: The number of streams the GPU can handle is different depending on driver versions and hardware, however in general it is 2 streams max on Geforce level cards. Using a lower resolution does not avoid the 2 stream limit. Quadros can do more streams.

See also the Video Stream In TOP.

Parameters

Active active - Controls if the server is active or not. If this is Off then the port this server uses will not be tied up.

Network Port port - The port the server should listen on. Multiple Video Stream Out TOPs can use the same port as long as each has a unique Stream Name.

Stream Name streamname - The name of the stream for this node. This name is what comes after the / in the URL after the ipaddress:port combination.

Multi-Cast multicast - Controls if RTSP server sends its video out using unicast or multicast UDP packets.

Force IDR forceidr - For debugging, this will force the server to create a new video keyframe to send to all the clients. If clients aren't getting proper image this can be used to attempt to fix it. If you need to use this parameter please report the case to support@derivative.ca.

FPS port - The FPS to send video at.

Profile profile - The H.264 profile to use to encode the frames. Some decoders can only support H.264 encoder at certain profiles.

Quality quality - The quality level of the encoding.

Bitrate bitrate - The target bitrate for the encoding. This is specified in Mb/s (megabits/second).

Num H264 Slices Per Frame numslices - This controls how many pieces (slices) each H.264 frame is separated into. Some decoders are able to decode multiple slices simultaneously so setting this to a value above 1 allows those decoders to run more efficiently.

Audio CHOP audiochop - A timesliced audio source to send along with the video. Audio will be resampled to 44100Hz before being encoded into MP3.

Parameters - Common Page

Resolution - quickly change the resolution of the TOP's data.

  • Input - uses the input's resolution.
  • Eighth, Quarter, Half, 2X, 4X, 8X - multiply the input's resolution by that amount.
  • Fit Resolution - Resizes the input to the size specified in Resolution using the best possible match that does not crop any of the input. It will resize the image to be larger than the input resolution if a larger resolution is specified. It's a "fit inside", Aspect Ratio is maintained.
  • Limit Resolution - Limits the input to the size specified in Resolution using the best possible match that does not crop any of the input. It's a "fit inside", Aspect Ratio is maintained.
  • Custom Resolution - enables the Resolution parameter below, giving direct control over width and height.

Resolution - enabled only when the Resolution parameter is set to Custom Resolution. Some Generators like Constant and Ramp do not use inputs and only use this field to determine their size. The drop down menu on the right provides some commonly used resolutions.

Use Global Resolution Multiplier - Uses the Global Resolution Multiplier found in Edit>Preferences>TOPs. This multiplies all the TOPs resolutions by the set amount. This is handy when working on computers with different hardware specifications. If a project is designed on a desktop workstation with lots of graphics memory, a user on a laptop with only 64MB VRAM can set the Global Resolution Multiplier to a value of half or quarter so it runs at an acceptable speed. By checking this checkbox on, this TOP is affected by the global multiplier.

Output Aspect - sets the image aspect ratio allowing any textures to be viewed in any size. Watch for unexpected results when compositing TOPs with different aspect ratios. (You can define images with non-square pixels using xres, yres, aspectx, aspecty where xres/yres != aspectx/aspecty.)

  • Input - uses the input's aspect ratio.
  • Resolution - uses the aspect of the image's defined resolution (ie 512x256 would be 2:1), whereby each pixel is square.
  • Custom Aspect - lets you explicitly define a custom aspect ratio.

Input Smoothness - This controls pixel filtering on the input image of the TOP.

  • Nearest Pixel - uses nearest pixel or accurate image representation. Images will look jaggy when viewing at any zoom level other than Native Resolution.
  • Interpolate Pixels - uses linear filtering between pixels. This is how you get TOP images in viewers to look good at various zoom levels, especially useful when using any Fill Viewer setting other than Native Resolution.
  • Mipmap Pixels - uses mipmap filtering when scaling images. This can be used to reduce artifacts and sparkling in moving/scaling images that have lots of detail.

Fill Viewer - determine how the TOP image is displayed in the viewer.

  • Input - uses the same Fill Viewer settings as it's input.
  • Fill - stretches the image to fit the edges of the viewer.
  • Fit Horizontal - stretches image to fit viewer horizontally.
  • Fit Vertical - stretches image to fit viewer vertically.
  • Fit Best - stretches or squashes image so no part of image is cropped.
  • Fit Outside - stretches or squashes image so image fills viewer while constraining it's proportions. This often leads to part of image getting cropped by viewer.
  • Native Resolution - displays the native resolution of the image in the viewer.

NOTE: To get an understanding of how TOPs works with images, you will want to set this to Native Resolution as you lay down TOPs when starting out. This will let you see what is actually happening without any automatic viewer resizing.

Viewer Smoothness - This controls pixel filtering in the viewers.

  • Nearest Pixel - uses nearest pixel or accurate image representation. Images will look jaggy when viewing at any zoom level other than Native Resolution.
  • Interpolate Pixels - uses linear filtering between pixels. Use this to get TOP images in viewers to look good at various zoom levels, especially useful when using any Fill Viewer setting other than Native Resolution.
  • Mipmap Pixels - uses mipmap filtering when scaling images. This can be used to reduce artifacts and sparkling in moving/scaling images that have lots of detail. When the input is 32-bit float format, only nearest filtering will be used (regardless of what is selected).

Passes - duplicates the operation of the TOP the specified number of times.

Channel Mask - Allows you to choose which channels (R, G, B, or A) the TOP will operate on. All channels are selected by default.

Pixel Format - format used to store data for each channel in the image (ie. R, G, B, and A). Fixed format values are limited to the range [0-1]. Refer to Pixel Formats for more information.

  • Input - uses the input's pixel format.
  • 8-bit fixed (RGBA) - uses 8-bit integer values for each channel.
  • 16-bit float (RGBA) - uses 16-bits per color channel, 64-bits per pixel.
  • 32-bit float (RGBA) - uses 32-bits per color channel, 128-bits per pixels.


  • 10-bit RGB, 2-bit Alpha, fixed (RGBA) - uses 10-bits per color channel and 2-bits for alpha, 32-bits total per pixel.
  • 16-bit fixed (RGBA) - uses 16-bits per color channel, 64-bits total per pixel.
  • 11-bit float (RGB), Positive Values Only - A RGB floating point format that has 11 bits for the Red and Green channels, and 10-bits for the Blue Channel, 32-bits total per pixel (therefore the same memory usage as 8-bit RGBA). The Alpha channel in this format will always be 1. Values can go above one, but can't be negative. ie. the range is [0, infinite).
  • 8-bit fixed (R) - has 8-bits for the red channel, 8-bits total per pixel.
  • 16-bit fixed (R) - has 16-bits for the red channel, 16-bits total per pixel.
  • 16-bit float (R) - has 16-bits for the red channel, 16-bits per pixel.
  • 32-bit float (R) - has 32-bits for the red channel, 32-bits per pixel.
  • 8-bit fixed (RG) - has 8-bits for the red and green channels, 16-bits total per pixel.
  • 16-bit fixed (RG) - has 16-bits for the red and green channels, 32-bits total per pixel.
  • 16-bit float (RG) - has 16-bits for the red and green channels, 32-bits per pixel.
  • 32-bit float (RG) - has 32-bits for the red and green channels, 64-bits per pixel.
  • 8-bit fixed (A) - An Alpha only format that has 8-bits per channel, 8-bits per pixel.
  • 16-bit float (A) - An Alpha only format that has 16-bits per channel, 16-bits per pixel.
  • 32-bit float (A) - An Alpha only format that has 32-bits per channel, 32-bits per pixel.